Science

Discover the science behind snoring

snoring men and women

Snoring: How Does It Happen?


Roughly 40% of men and 20% of women snore - that’s over 2 billion inhabitants of planet Earth. A snore is the sound of soft tissue in your upper airway vibrating due to interrupted airflow. Snoring is the result of a relaxed airway being obstructed, made possible by some design flaws in the anatomy of the human throat. But what is a snore?

polysomnography charts

Sleep Apnea: Screening, Testing and Treatment


Sleep apnea is a serious condition where your airway repeatedly closes during sleep, depriving you of oxygen until you gasp awake. The combined effects of disturbed sleep and repeated bouts of low oxygen cause lots of problems for your physical and mental health. Despite this, many sufferers remain undiagnosed. But how do you get diagnosed? There are several steps towards understanding and…

diagram man sleep apnea airway closure

What is Sleep Apnea?


Apnea simply means “no breathing”. Sleep apnea is a serious condition where your airway repeatedly closes during sleep, depriving you of oxygen until you gasp awake. It is a common misconception that all loud snorers have sleep apnea, but if you think you do, ask yourself or your partner if you have any of the following: loud snoring with periodic silence and choking/gasping, sore throat or…

scales showing overweight

Overweight and Snoring: A Vicious Circle


Being a snorer and being overweight are interchangeably linked. In other words, obesity can cause snoring and snoring can cause obesity. Loud snoring is often a stepping stone towards sleep breathing disorders such as sleep apnea, and the link with bodyweight is startling. Obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) value more than 30kg/m2, is the most significant risk factor for the development…

jetlag man unsure of time body clock

Body Clock: Sleep, Light and Melatonin


Have you ever wondered why you feel sleepy at night and awake in the day? This daily fluctuation is your natural body clock working correctly. Our feelings of sleepiness or wakefulness are dictated by light and what it does to our brains. Our eyes don’t work very well in the dark, so it makes sense that we use this time to sleep and recover. Our feelings of sleepiness or wakefulness are dictated…